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20121201
20121231
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
fogood o ill and embodied what was important about the year. the magazine's list included mohamed morsi, tim cook and malala yousafzai, the pakistani teach ager shot for advocating girl's education. rick stengel joins me now. he's the managing editor of time. how do you go about selecting the person of the year. and in the end you decide. >> and in the end i decide. >> rose: don't you love privilege? >> (laughs) it weighs on your shoulders alwa time, as you know. probably beginning in the middle of the year we start thinking about it, a month or so later i start asking people like you, members of the "time" 100, our correspondents, editors, writers start sending in suggestions and have meetings and then we start talking about ideas, tloung out names, sometimes it's not a person but a group of people, like last year, the protest. the end we whittle it down to a short list and then we choose. >> what is it you that you measure them by? >> it's a historical thing, charlie. you measure them in part by past person of the year winners. i always like to feel the person who wins person of the y
on the constitution has become a referendum on egypt's islamic president, mohamed morsi. >> reporter: both sides of the egyptian political divide plan major marches and rallies this morning. government supporters are calling a yes vote on the referendum a vote for islam. the opposition is fragmented and far less organized and decided only a few days ago to vote no rather than boycott the ballot. the new constitution was drafted by the ruling islamist party and its hard-line political allies. the mainly secular opposition says the 63-page document does not represent all of egypt's 83 million people and tramples on the rights of minorities such as christians. a major problem is a lack of monitors. a significant number of judges have refused to supervisor the 13,000 polling stations so the voting will have to be held over two days first in major cities an then in the countryside. many egyptians are simply growing weary after two years of political turmoil. adding to their woes is the effect on the economy. the tourism industry has been hard-hit and the prospects of attracting f
out in tahrir square. also amassing supporters of president mohamed morsi and a controversial vote this weekend on a new constitution. today as you might imagine, tensions are very high as the political crisis threatens to ignite new conflicts. reza, what is happening now? >> reporter: ted, i don't think too many people want a repeat performance what have we saw last week, at the presidential palace where the two sides of the conflict met here and came to blows, nearly 700 people injured in clashes, several people killed. today the stage is set for another potentially violent and explosive day, because both these sides again have called for mass demonstrations within the next hour, opposition factions, critics of the president, have set out on marches that are going to culminate here at the presidential palace. in about 15, 20 minutes away from this location, that's where the muslim brotherhood, the supporters of the president, have called for their own demonstrations. i think a lot of people are relieved that these demonstrations aren't going to be at the same location but the pot
mohamed morsi, a scene of shooting earlier today. but the focus tonight, rick, is a few miles away from where we are right now, the presidential palace. anti--morsi protesters out there in big time. they've been trying to knock down a barrier made of rock and steel separating them and the palace, all the while supporters of morsi are gathering not too far away also in big numbers. there was a deadly clash between those two sides just one week ago. the fear is this could happen again. the difference, however, between now and then is that morsi in the interim has endowed the military here with stronger powers. they can intervene, maybe break up some violence. now, all the while this is all focused on that draft constitution which is planned for a vote, a referendum on saturday. the critics of morsi say that he's trying to rush it through. they say it's discriminatory towards segments of the population here, and they also say that his own style over the last couple weeks reminiscent of one other strong man we've seen here in egypt, mubarak. for his part morsi and his supporters say they we
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)